Reference Standards

Training and Development

Sika strictly follows all laws and regulations which are applicable to its business. The company and all its employees strictly follow the Sika Code of Conduct, no matter where they work and what their function is even if it is stricter than applicable local laws.

Sika adheres to the ten principles of the UN Global Compact and uses the GRI Standards. To integrate the views and interests of all stakeholders and to reinforce commitment, Sika has signed the UN Global Compact, and holds a World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) membership.

Human Rights

Construction worker standing  inside Gotthard Tunnel in Switzerland

Human rights are part of the Sika Code of Conduct and the Policies
and Principles of the company. The General Managers are obligated to
strictly adhere to legal practices and to supervise the subsidiary
accordingly. Also, they are responsible for taking preventative action.
Human rights reviews are included in the internal audit program and the
legal audits which are performed regularly in subsidiaries.

Around 20 internal audits and 10 legal audits are performed annually,
corresponding to around 20% of Sika’s subsidiaries. This is a
preliminary report based on the supervision principles outlined above.

Freedom of association

Freedom of Association

Sika strictly follows the 10 UN Global Compact Principles and acknowledges the freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining ( see Global Compact? Principle Three: "Businesses should uphold the freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining.")

UN Global Compact
  • Ensure that all workers are able to form and join a trade union of their choice without fear of intimidation or reprisal, in accordance with national law.
  • Put in place non-discriminatory policies and procedures with respect to trade union organization, union membership and activity in such areas as applications for employment and decisions on advancement, dismissal or transfer.
  • Do not interfere with the activities of worker representatives while they carry out their functions in ways that are not disruptive to regular company operations. Practices such as allowing the collection of union dues on company premises, posting of trade union notices, distribution of union documents, and provision of office space, have proven to help build good relations between management and workers, provided that they are not used as a way for the company to exercise indirect control.
  • Provide workers’ representatives with appropriate facilities to assist in the development of effective collective agreement.
At the bargaining table
  • Recognize representative organizations for the purpose of collective bargaining.
  • Use collective bargaining as a constructive forum for addressing working conditions and terms of employment and relations between employers and workers, or their respective organizations.
  • Address any problem-solving or other needs of interest to workers and management, including restructuring and training, redundancy procedures, safety and health issues, grievance and dispute settlement procedures, disciplinary rules, and family and community welfare.
  • Provide information needed for meaningful bargaining.
  • Balance dealings with the most representative trade union to ensure the viability of smaller organizations to continue to represent their members.
In the community of operation
  • Preserve the confidentiality of the trade unions and leaders in countries where the government does not permit respect for human rights (including rights at work) or does not provide a proper legal and institutional framework for industrial relations and collective bargaining.
  • Support the establishment and functioning of local/national employers' organizations, and trade unions.
  • Inform the local community, media and public authorities of your company's endorsement of the UN Global Compact and its intention to respect its provisions, including those on fundamental workers' rights.

Child Labour and Forced Labour

Sika strictly follows the 10 UN Global Compact Principles and does not? accept child labour (see Global Compact Principle Five: "Businesses should uphold the effective abolition of child labour.").

UN Global Compact
Minimum Age for Admission to Employment or Work

? Developed Countries Developing Countries
Light Work 13 Years 12 Years
Regular Work 15 Years 14 Years
Hazardous Work 18 Years 18 Years

?

ILO Convention No. 182 requires governments to give priority to eliminating the worst forms of child labour undertaken by all children under the age of 18 years. ?

Discrimination

Sika flooring system in parking garage Lammermarkt in Leiden Netherlands

Sika strictly follows all laws and regulations which are? applicable to the business. Furthermore the company strictly follows the Sika Code of Conduct even if it is stricter than applicable local laws. The chapter 9 of the Code of Conduct refers to fair working condition which includes a zero tolerance with regard to harassment and discrimination. Treating each other fairly and with respect is an inherent part of the Sika culture,? the so-called “Sika Spirit”. For more information, please consult the
Sika Code of Conduct.

Working Conditions for handicapped people

Any discrimination based on race, religion, sex, nationality, disability, age or any other discriminatory characteristic is strictly forbidden. Sika supports non-discriminatory practices in terms of employment, and practices equal opportunities in the recruitment process and in the professional development of its employees.
In a specific workshop area of the Gournay plant at Sika France for example, up to 20 disabled people from sheltered areas produce customized products for different markets, which generate annual turnover of 12 mio. Euro. With initiatives like this, Sika provides integration of people in usual professional activities and social life.

Anti Corruption

Ant Corruption

Integrity and ethical conduct have always been an? inherent part of Sika’s culture. Ethical conduct is one of the cornerstones on which Sika’s excellent reputation is built. Customers count on it, but also all other stakeholders, most notably shareholders and all personnel working for Sika. Therefore there is no? room for negotiation or interpretation when it comes to following the Sika Code of Conduct with regard to our zero tolerance in the realm of? corruption.

Compliance with these rules is ensured through e-learning tools,? personal training sessions and various audits, managed by Group Management and the General Counsel. Investigations are launched into all cases of suspected misconduct. Confirmed violations are penalized and can lead to dismissal. In the reporting period Sika recorded no public allegation or sanctions of violations of its rules. ?

Monitoring and Steering

Monitoring and Steering

Central Point of Contact (Help Desk):
If Sika employees throughout the world are in doubt or have questions regarding any issues related to the content of the Sika Code of Conduct, they are asked to contact their superiors or a colleague from Corporate Legal or Corporate HR. ?

Internal Audits:
Sika? standards in the domain of human rights are documented in the Sika Code of Conduct and in the Policies and Principles of the company. The General Managers are obligated to a zero tolerance and to strictly adhere to legal practices and to supervise the subsidiary accordingly. Also, they are responsible for taking preventative action. Human rights reviews are included in the internal audit program and the legal audits which are performed regularly in subsidiaries. Around? 20 internal audits and 10 legal audits are performed annually,? corresponding to around 20% of Sika’s subsidiaries each year. ?

Stakeholder Dialogue:
The theme of stakeholder engagement runs across the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. Via materiality assessments and a sustainability advisory board the company makes sure that it understands and responds to the interests and concerns of all stakeholders.

Compensation and Benefits

Three construction workers talking inside Gotthard Tunnel in Switzerland

Sika companies and their employees comply with global and local labour and social standards. This means that staff is remunerated according to prevailing? international and national regulations and laws. Regulations on minimum
wages are binding. Besides international and national standards, company, team and? individual performance determines compensation level. Compensation is
reviewed yearly and is determined based on the scope and responsibility of the role, the external market value of the role and the skills,? experience and performance of the individual in the role. Progress and performance of employees are continuously monitored and are reflected by the market compensation practice in each country.

The remuneration strategy is developed and determined on corporate level by Corporate HR and on country level by the regional and local HR in close collaboration with the Group and local management. The best practice Compensation and Benefits strategies are implemented in order to ensure efficient and effective management of rewards and to attract,? motivate and retain highly qualified and engaged employees.